Establishing the Validity of Recovery From Stuttering Without Formal Treatment There is no empirical basis for determining goals for stuttering treatment. One approach that might resolve this issue is to systematically investigate persons who claim to have recovered from stuttering without the assistance of treatment. However, critical methodological and conceptual issues must be overcome first in order to assure these ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1996
Establishing the Validity of Recovery From Stuttering Without Formal Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick Finn
    University of New Mexico Albuquerque
  • Contact author: Patrick Finn, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, 901 Vassar NE, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131. Email: pfinn@unm.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1996
Establishing the Validity of Recovery From Stuttering Without Formal Treatment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1171-1181. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1171
History: Received March 26, 1996 , Accepted June 21, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1171-1181. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1171
History: Received March 26, 1996; Accepted June 21, 1996

There is no empirical basis for determining goals for stuttering treatment. One approach that might resolve this issue is to systematically investigate persons who claim to have recovered from stuttering without the assistance of treatment. However, critical methodological and conceptual issues must be overcome first in order to assure these persons had a valid stuttering problem and that their recovery was independent of treatment. This study examined a validation procedure for solving these issues based on the combination of two methods: independent verification and self-reports. Forty-two subjects participated: 14 adults who recovered from stuttering without assistance, 14 adults with persistent stuttering, and 14 adults who were normally fluent speakers. For the independent verification, a Speech Behavior Checklist was administered to 42 individuals familiar with the recovered subjects' past speech and the other subjects' current speech. Results indicated that persons who knew the recovered subjects when they used to stutter recalled speech behaviors consistent with subjects who still stuttered, but not the same as speech behaviors consistent with subjects who never stuttered. These findings were supported by an objective analysis of the recovered subjects' descriptions of their past stuttering. Furthermore, a content analysis of subjects' self-reports indicated that recovery was independent of treatment.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by a New Investigators Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation and a Research Allocations Grant from the University of New Mexico.
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