Generalizability Theory I Assessing Reliability of Observational Data in the Communication Sciences Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2003
Generalizability Theory I
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nigel O'Brian, PhD
    The University of Sydney Australia
  • Sue O'Brian
    The University of Sydney Australia
  • Ann Packman
    The University of Sydney Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    The University of Sydney Australia
  • Contact author: Nigel O'Brian, PhD, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. E-mail: nigel@maths.usyd.edu.au
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2003
Generalizability Theory I
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2003, Vol. 46, 711-717. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/056)
History: Received August 19, 2002 , Accepted December 11, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2003, Vol. 46, 711-717. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/056)
History: Received August 19, 2002; Accepted December 11, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Perceptual rating scales can be valid, reliable, and convenient tools for evaluating speech outcomes in research and clinical practice. However, they depend on the perceptions of observers. Too few raters may compromise accuracy, whereas too many would be inefficient. There is therefore a need to determine the minimum number of raters required for a reliable result. In this context, the ideas of Generalizability Theory have become increasingly popular in the behavioral sciences; suggestions have been made for their application to the assessment of speech-language disorders. Here we review the concepts involved, which are applied in a companion article dealing with speech naturalness data obtained from clients who recently completed treatment for their stuttering. We pay particular attention to the statistical requirements of the theory, including some cautions about possible inappropriate use of these techniques. We also offer a new interpretation of the results of the analysis that aims to be more meaningful to most speech-language pathologists.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access