The Effect of Short-Term Auditory Deprivation on the Control of Intraoral Pressure in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users The purpose of this study was to determine whether 2 speech measures (peak intraoral air pressure [IOP] and IOP duration) obtained during the production of intervocalic stops would be altered as a function of the presence or absence of auditory stimulation provided by a cochlear implant (CI). Five pediatric CI ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2003
The Effect of Short-Term Auditory Deprivation on the Control of Intraoral Pressure in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David L. Jones
    University of Wyoming Laramie
  • Sujuan Gao
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Mario A. Svirsky
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: David L. Jones, Division of Communication Disorders, University of Wyoming, P.O. Box 3311, Laramie, WY 82071-3311. E-mail: dljones@uwyo.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2003
The Effect of Short-Term Auditory Deprivation on the Control of Intraoral Pressure in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2003, Vol. 46, 658-669. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/052)
History: Received June 19, 2002 , Accepted October 16, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2003, Vol. 46, 658-669. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/052)
History: Received June 19, 2002; Accepted October 16, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

The purpose of this study was to determine whether 2 speech measures (peak intraoral air pressure [IOP] and IOP duration) obtained during the production of intervocalic stops would be altered as a function of the presence or absence of auditory stimulation provided by a cochlear implant (CI). Five pediatric CI users were required to produce repetitions of the words puppy and baby with their CIs turned on. The CIs were then turned off for 1 hr, at which time the speech sample was repeated with the CI still turned off. Seven children with normal hearing formed a comparison group. They were also tested twice, with a 1-hr intermediate interval. IOP and IOP duration were measured for the medial consonant in both auditory conditions. The results show that auditory condition affected peak IOP more so than IOP duration. Peak IOP was greater for /p/ than /b/ with the CI off, but some participants reduced or reversed this contrast when the CI was on. The findings suggest that different speakers with CIs may use different speech production strategies as they learn to use the auditory signal for speech.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC00423. We thank Allyson Riley for her assistance with data collection.
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