Contributions of Individual Muscles to the Submental Surface Electromyogram During Swallowing Submental surface electromyographic recordings are commonly used in the investigation of swallowing disorders. The measured electromyography is thought to reflect the actions of floor-of-mouth muscles. Although this is a reasonable assumption, to date there have been no investigations to delineate which muscles contribute to this surface recording. The primary goal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1999
Contributions of Individual Muscles to the Submental Surface Electromyogram During Swallowing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phyllis M. Palmer
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Erich S. Luschei
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Debra Jaffe
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Iowa City
  • Timothy M. McCulloch
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Iowa City
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: ppalmer@med-info.com
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1999
Contributions of Individual Muscles to the Submental Surface Electromyogram During Swallowing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1378-1391. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1378
History: Received August 4, 1998 , Accepted May 24, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1378-1391. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1378
History: Received August 4, 1998; Accepted May 24, 1999

Submental surface electromyographic recordings are commonly used in the investigation of swallowing disorders. The measured electromyography is thought to reflect the actions of floor-of-mouth muscles. Although this is a reasonable assumption, to date there have been no investigations to delineate which muscles contribute to this surface recording. The primary goal of this experiment was to determine which muscles contribute most to the submental surface. Electromyography was recorded simultaneously from the submental surface as well as from five individual muscles: mylohyoid, anterior belly of the digastric, geniohyoid, genioglossus and platysma. Three analysis methods were performed to estimate individual muscle contributions: correlation, numeric, and analytic. For the numeric and analytic analyses, a linear model was defined and used to represent the relationship between the surface and intramuscular recordings. Muscles that received a high correlation, numeric and/or analytic value were considered to be primary contributors to the submental recording. Regardless of analysis approach, the primary contributions to the submental surface recording were the mylohyoid, anterior belly of the digastric, and the geniohyoid muscles. Contributions from the genioglossus and the platysma muscles were minimal. Contributions as a function of bolus volume and viscosity are also discussed.

Acknowledgments
The first author is sincerely grateful to the other authors as well as to Ingo Titze, Brad Story, Jerry Moon, and Kevin Rosenberg for their guidance throughout this project. This project received funding from (a) the National Center for Voice and Speech (NIH Grant P60 DC00976) and (b) the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.
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