Electromagnetic Articulography Treatment for an Adult With Broca’s Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Electromagnetic articulography (EMA) was explored as a means of remediating [s]/[∫] articulation deficits in the speech of an adult with Broca’s aphasia and apraxia of speech. Over a 1-month period, the subject was provided with 2 different treatments in a counterbalanced procedure: (1) visually guided biofeedback concerning tongue-tip position and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1999
Electromagnetic Articulography Treatment for an Adult With Broca’s Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William F. Katz
    University of Texas at Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Sneha V. Bharadwaj
    University of Texas at Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Burkhard Carstens
    Carstens Medizinelektronik, GmbH Lenglern, Germany
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: wkatz@utdallas.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1999
Electromagnetic Articulography Treatment for an Adult With Broca’s Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1355-1366. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1355
History: Received July 9, 1998 , Accepted April 27, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1355-1366. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1355
History: Received July 9, 1998; Accepted April 27, 1999

Electromagnetic articulography (EMA) was explored as a means of remediating [s]/[∫] articulation deficits in the speech of an adult with Broca’s aphasia and apraxia of speech. Over a 1-month period, the subject was provided with 2 different treatments in a counterbalanced procedure: (1) visually guided biofeedback concerning tongue-tip position and (2) a foil treatment in which a computer program delivered voicing-contrast stimuli for simple repetition. Kinematic and perceptual data suggest improvement resulting from visually guided biofeedback, both for nonspeech oral and, to a lesser extent, speech motor tasks. In contrast, the phonetic contrast treated in the foil condition showed only marginal improvement during the therapy session, with performance dropping back to baseline 10 weeks post-treatment. Although preliminary, the findings suggest that visual biofeedback concerning tongue-tip position can be used to treat nonspeech oral and (to a lesser extent) speech motor behavior in adults with Broca’s aphasia and apraxia of speech.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by IDEA Program Grant 97–13 from Texas Instruments. We thank Willi Nagl for statistical advice and Rebecca Nawy for help in data analysis. Earlier versions of this paper were presented at the 35th Meeting of the Academy of Aphasia (Philadelphia) and the Sixth Meeting of the International Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics Association (Nijmegen, Holland).
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