Psychometrically Equivalent Spondaic Words Spoken by a Female Speaker Several studies demonstrate that thresholds for the individual CID W-1 spondaic words peaked at 0 vu are not equivalent. The purpose of this study was to equate the spondaic word thresholds psychometrically. Two studies were performed on 2 groups of 20 listeners with normal hearing. In Experiment 1, psychometric functions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1999
Psychometrically Equivalent Spondaic Words Spoken by a Female Speaker
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard H. Wilson
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Mountain Home, Tennessee and Departments of Surgery and Communicative Disorders East Tennessee State University Johnson City, Tennessee
  • Anne Strouse
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Mountain Home, Tennessee and Departments of Surgery and Communicative Disorders East Tennessee State University Johnson City, Tennessee
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1999
Psychometrically Equivalent Spondaic Words Spoken by a Female Speaker
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1336-1346. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1336
History: Received January 27, 1999 , Accepted May 26, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1336-1346. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1336
History: Received January 27, 1999; Accepted May 26, 1999

Several studies demonstrate that thresholds for the individual CID W-1 spondaic words peaked at 0 vu are not equivalent. The purpose of this study was to equate the spondaic word thresholds psychometrically. Two studies were performed on 2 groups of 20 listeners with normal hearing. In Experiment 1, psychometric functions were established for the 36 spondaic words spoken by a male (original recording) and female speaker. Based on the threshold data from Experiment 1, the words spoken by the female speaker were adjusted digitally in level to produce equal thresholds (equal intelligibility). In Experiment 2, psychometric functions then were established for the 36 spondaic words adjusted in level. The mean thresholds for the 2 experiments were the same (0.5 dB HL; ANSI, 1996), but the standard deviations for the word thresholds in Experiment 2 (0.7 dB) were significantly smaller than the standard deviations in Experiment 1 (1.6 dB). Both versions of the spondaic words spoken by the female speaker are included on the Speech Recognition and Identification Materials (Disc 2.0) compact disc.

Acknowledgments
This project was made possible by funding to the Auditory Research Laboratory at Mountain Home from the Rehabilitation, Research and Development Service and Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs. The second author is on a Career Development Award sponsored by the Rehabilitation, Research and Development Service. Portions of this paper were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 1998, San Antonio, TX.
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