Improvements in Speech Perception With Use of the AVR TranSonic Frequency-Transposing Hearing Aid Five adults with sensorineural hearing impairment participated in a trial comparing the performance of the AVR TranSonic frequency-transposing hearing aid with that of their own conventional aids. They used the TranSonic for approximately 12 weeks, during which time systematic changes were made to the transposition parameters. Speech perception was assessed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1999
Improvements in Speech Perception With Use of the AVR TranSonic Frequency-Transposing Hearing Aid
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hugh J. McDermott
    Co-operative Research Centre for Cochlear Implant, Speech and Hearing Research East Melbourne, Australia
  • Voula P. Dorkos
    Co-operative Research Centre for Cochlear Implant, Speech and Hearing Research East Melbourne, Australia
  • Michelle R. Dean
    Co-operative Research Centre for Cochlear Implant, Speech and Hearing Research East Melbourne, Australia
  • Teresa Y. C. Ching
    Co-operative Research Centre for Cochlear Implant, Speech and Hearing Research East Melbourne, Australia
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1999
Improvements in Speech Perception With Use of the AVR TranSonic Frequency-Transposing Hearing Aid
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1323-1335. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1323
History: Received September 21, 1998 , Accepted May 12, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1323-1335. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1323
History: Received September 21, 1998; Accepted May 12, 1999

Five adults with sensorineural hearing impairment participated in a trial comparing the performance of the AVR TranSonic frequency-transposing hearing aid with that of their own conventional aids. They used the TranSonic for approximately 12 weeks, during which time systematic changes were made to the transposition parameters. Speech perception was assessed with each setting of those parameters and with the participants’ own hearing aids. Four participants obtained significantly higher scores with the TranSonic than with their own aids on at least one of the tests. However, analysis of the consonant confusions suggested that the improvement resulted mostly from the TranSonic’s low-frequency electro-acoustic characteristics. There was only limited evidence for 2 of the participants that the frequency-lowering function was effective at improving speech perception.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank the five volunteers who participated so willingly in the experiments. Many colleagues assisted with this work, particularly Dr. H. Dillon, P. Cameron, and G. Upfold of Australian Hearing; B. Dar of AVR Communications Ltd.; and Prof. G. Clark. We also appreciate the constructive criticism of the reviewers and editors who commented on a previous version of this manuscript.
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