Comparison of Risk of Conductive Hearing Loss Among Three Ethnic Groups of Arctic Audiology Patients The purpose of the study was to investigate the relative contributions of age, gender, ethnic background, and a history of middle ear disease on the amount of conductive hearing impairment among native and non-native audiology patients in the Canadian North. A second goal of the study was to determine risk ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1999
Comparison of Risk of Conductive Hearing Loss Among Three Ethnic Groups of Arctic Audiology Patients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan Allison Moore
    The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jan-moore@uiowa.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1999
Comparison of Risk of Conductive Hearing Loss Among Three Ethnic Groups of Arctic Audiology Patients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1311-1322. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1311
History: Received March 2, 1998 , Accepted May 12, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1999, Vol. 42, 1311-1322. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4206.1311
History: Received March 2, 1998; Accepted May 12, 1999

The purpose of the study was to investigate the relative contributions of age, gender, ethnic background, and a history of middle ear disease on the amount of conductive hearing impairment among native and non-native audiology patients in the Canadian North. A second goal of the study was to determine risk factors for conductive hearing loss in the patients studied. Three ethnic groups were represented among the 3,094 patients: Inuit, American Indian, and non-native. Loglinear and logit statistical models were applied, and these data were best explained by a 3-way interaction of history of middle ear disease, ethnic group, and hearing loss, and the 2-way interaction of age and hearing loss. The Inuit appear to be at higher risk for conductive hearing impairment than the other ethnic groups. Conductive hearing loss also appears to increase as age increases through the teenage years for all the patients regardless of ethnic group membership. Preschoolers were at the lowest risk for conductive hearing loss. The trend for the amount of hearing impairment to increase throughout childhood suggests that children living in the Arctic may manifest a unique and more serious form of the disease not often observed in audiology patients who are Caucasian in southern Canada or the United States or that they may be exposed to additional risk factors.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by a private grant given by the Yellowknife Elks Lodge 314 to the Audiology department at Stanton Yellowknife Hospital. I would like to thank the following people whose assistance greatly contributed to completion of this project: Charissa Lansing, Robert Bilger, Larry Todd, Mike McCullum, Mike Woods, and the late Demetri Shimkin. I also thank Ruth Bentler, Don Robin, Bruce Tomblin, and Chris Turner for their thoughtful reviews of earlier versions of this manuscript. I thank Steve Hillis for his insight on categorical data analysis.
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