DNA Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of a Vocal Fold Polyp and Granuloma Genome-wide transcriptional profiling has important applications in advancing knowledge of vocal fold biology. With the use of DNA microarray technology, analysis of global patterns of gene expression can reveal unexpected networks of coordinated regulation in the extracellular matrix of the lamina propria. Transcriptional gene expression patterns for 2 vocal fold ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 2003
DNA Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of a Vocal Fold Polyp and Granuloma
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan L. Thibeault
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Scot D. Hirschi
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Steven D. Gray
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Contact author: Susan L. Thibeault, PhD, Division of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Utah, 3C120 University Medical Center, 30 North 1900 East, Salt Lake City, UT 841322301. E-mail: susan.thibeault@hsc.utah.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 2003
DNA Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of a Vocal Fold Polyp and Granuloma
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 491-502. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/040)
History: Received November 7, 2001 , Accepted November 8, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 491-502. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/040)
History: Received November 7, 2001; Accepted November 8, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Genome-wide transcriptional profiling has important applications in advancing knowledge of vocal fold biology. With the use of DNA microarray technology, analysis of global patterns of gene expression can reveal unexpected networks of coordinated regulation in the extracellular matrix of the lamina propria. Transcriptional gene expression patterns for 2 vocal fold pathologies—vocal fold polyp (VP; N= 1) and vocal fold granuloma (VG; N= 1) were analyzed by means of DNA microarray analysis for 4,632 human genes using another patient's true vocal fold (TVF; N= 1) as a control. Twenty-four and 29 genes for VG and VP, respectively, were established to be either over- or underexpressed compared to that of TVF. Five-way cluster analysis revealed broad patterns that suggest a potential degree of organization underlying gene expression in these tissues. For the 1 VG, genes involved represent inflammation and wound healing; for the 1 VP, involved genes demonstrate a tempered wound repair response and increased epithelial manifestations. These results successfully demonstrate the use of DNA microarray technology as a new approach for further investigations dissecting vocal fold disease. Further investigation is needed on larger sample sizes to establish transcriptional gene expression patterns for VP and VG.

Acknowledgments
We dedicate this article to the memory of Steven D. Gray, MD, our mentor and friend who passed away in September 2002. Steve shared his profound knowledge and enthusiasm for voice biology, continually challenging us to grow as scientists. We will be forever influenced by his wisdom, friendship, and selflessness.
We thank Charles N. Ford, MD, and Gregory T. Hartig, MD, of the Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin–Madison, for providing specimens used in this study. We would like to thank Diane Bless, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin–Madison for her mentorship to the first author during her doctoral dissertation. This work represents a portion of the first author's dissertation completed in the Department of Communicative Disorders at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC4336.
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