Implementing Speech Supplementation Strategies Effects on Intelligibility and Speech Rate of Individuals With Chronic Severe Dysarthria Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2003
Implementing Speech Supplementation Strategies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine C. Hustad, PhD
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Tabitha Jones
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Suzanne Dailey
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Contact author: Katherine C. Hustad, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16803. E-mail: kch2@psu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2003
Implementing Speech Supplementation Strategies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 462-474. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/er02)
History: Received July 19, 2002 , Accepted November 7, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 462-474. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/er02)
History: Received July 19, 2002; Accepted November 7, 2002

A growing body of experimental research suggests that speech supplementation strategies can markedly increase speech intelligibility for individuals with dysarthria (D. Beukelman & K. Yorkston, 1977; E. Crow & P. Enderby, 1989; L. Hunter, T. Pring, & S. Martin, 1991; K. C. Hustad & D. R. Beukelman, 2001). However, studies in which speech supplementation strategies were actually implemented by speakers with dysarthria are limited, leaving their clinical efficacy unknown. The present study compared intelligibility and speech rate differences following speaker implementation of 3 strategies (topic, alphabet, and combined topic and alphabet supplementation) and a habitual (noncued) speech control condition for 5 speakers with severe dysarthria. Results revealed that combined cues and alphabet cues yielded significantly higher intelligibility scores and slower speech rates than topic cues and noncued speech. Overall, topic cues and noncued speech did not differ from one another with regard to intelligibility or speech rate. Combined cues and alphabet cues did not differ from one another with regard to intelligibility; however, speech rate was significantly different between the 2 strategies. Individual differences among speakers were generally consistent with group findings. Results were somewhat different from previous research in which strategies were experimentally superimposed on the habitual speech signal. However, findings provide evidence that alphabet cues and combined cues can have an important effect on intelligibility for speakers with severe dysarthria.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by a New Investigator grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. We wish to express special thanks to the speakers who participated in this study and to Dr. Robert Prosek for the use of his laboratory space for collecting data from listeners.
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