Perception of Place of Articulation by Children With Cleft Palate and Posterior Placement The aim of this study was to determine if children with repaired cleft palate who demonstrate posterior placement of alveolar targets (e.g., /th/ → [kh]), known as Group P, differ from children with cleft palate without such an error pattern Group NP) and from normally developing children without cleft palate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2003
Perception of Place of Articulation by Children With Cleft Palate and Posterior Placement
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tara L. Whitehill, PhD
    University of Hong Kong
  • Alexander L. Francis
    University of Hong Kong
  • Christine K-Y. Ching
    United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong
  • Contact author: Tara L. Whitehill, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Hong Kong, 34 Hospital Road (5th Floor), Hong Kong. E-mail: tara@hku.hk
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2003
Perception of Place of Articulation by Children With Cleft Palate and Posterior Placement
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 451-461. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/037)
History: Received March 22, 2002 , Accepted October 24, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 451-461. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/037)
History: Received March 22, 2002; Accepted October 24, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

The aim of this study was to determine if children with repaired cleft palate who demonstrate posterior placement of alveolar targets (e.g., /th/ → [kh]), known as Group P, differ from children with cleft palate without such an error pattern Group NP) and from normally developing children without cleft palate (Group N) in the perception of /th/ and /kh/. Ten age-matched children in each of these three groups identified 8 synthetic stimuli along an acoustic continuum ranging from /th/ to /kh/. The children with posterior placement performed at random levels, appearing unable to distinguish /th/ from /kh/. In contrast, both groups of children without posterior placement demonstrated a clear identification pattern. These results, which suggest that children with cleft palate and posterior placement have a perceptual deficit, contribute to discussion of the possible etiology of speech deficits in this population.

Acknowledgments
Alexander L. Francis is now at Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University. This work was based on an undergraduate honors dissertation conducted by the third author, under the supervision of the first two authors. Portions of this study were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans, LA, November 15–18, 2001. We are grateful to the Hong Kong Cleft Lip and Palate Association and to the children and families who agreed to participate.
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