Do Vocal Warm-Up Exercises Alleviate Vocal Fatigue? Vocal warm-up (WU) exercises of varying types and durations have been suggested as a way of improving vocal function. However, limited research has been conducted to assess the effects of vocal WU exercises on normal or disordered voices. This study attempted to manipulate vocal function, assessed by phonation threshold pressure ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2003
Do Vocal Warm-Up Exercises Alleviate Vocal Fatigue?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rochelle L. Milbrath
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Nancy Pearl Solomon, PhD
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Nancy Pearl Solomon, PhD, Army Audiology & Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 6900 Georgia Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20307. E-mail: nancy.solomon@na.amedd.army.mil
  • *Currently affiliated with the Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN
    Currently affiliated with the Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN×
  • **Currently affiliated with Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
    Currently affiliated with Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2003
Do Vocal Warm-Up Exercises Alleviate Vocal Fatigue?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 422-436. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/035)
History: Received July 1, 2002 , Accepted October 8, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 422-436. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/035)
History: Received July 1, 2002; Accepted October 8, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 40

Vocal warm-up (WU) exercises of varying types and durations have been suggested as a way of improving vocal function. However, limited research has been conducted to assess the effects of vocal WU exercises on normal or disordered voices. This study attempted to manipulate vocal function, assessed by phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and self-perceived phonatory effort (PPE) at 3 pitches, in 8 young women who reported symptoms of chronic vocal fatigue. Predictions were that PTP and PPE would decrease after 20 min of vocal WU exercises, increase after 1 hr of loud reading, and decrease after 30 min of vocal silence. Furthermore, greater increases in PTP and PPE were expected when the loud-reading task was preceded by a placebo condition of vocal rest than by vocal WU exercises. Results failed to reveal statistically significant changes in PTP or PPE after any of the experimental tasks. High between-subject variability contributed to this result. Removal of 1 outlier from the sample resulted in a statistically significant difference for PTP across tasks, although post hoc pairwise comparisons failed to detect specific effects. Informal inspection of the data indicated that the most obvious difference was an increase in PTP after the loud-reading task at the highest pitch.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on a thesis conducted by Rochelle L. Milbrath under the supervision of Nancy Pearl Solomon in partial fulfillment of the master of arts degree in communication disorders at the University of Minnesota. Partial funding was provided by the Clark Starr Fund for Master's Thesis Research. This research was presented at the 2001 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans, LA.
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