Repair Behavior in Children With Intellectual Impairments Evidence for Metalinguistic Competence Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2003
Repair Behavior in Children With Intellectual Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Y. Levy, PhD
    Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel
  • A. Tennebaum
    The Jerusalem Institute for Child and Family Development, Israel
  • A. Ornoy
    Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Contact author: Yonata Levy, PhD, Psychology Department, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel 91905. E-mail: msyonata@mscc.huji.ac.il
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2003
Repair Behavior in Children With Intellectual Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 368-381. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/029)
History: Received May 29, 2002 , Accepted November 26, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2003, Vol. 46, 368-381. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/029)
History: Received May 29, 2002; Accepted November 26, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

This paper tested the prediction that children with cognitive impairments who can use language intentionally will be able to carry out the metalinguistic operations involved in speech monitoring and repair. The specific linguistic characteristics of responses to requests for clarification given by 4 children with lower than normal IQ, ages 3 years 5 months to 6 years 10 months, were investigated. The analysis focused on children's ability to locate the specific errors that provoked neutral requests for clarification and produce repair. Three children could locate their errors and partly succeed in providing repair. It is suggested that ability to perform metaprocedures such as are implicated in repair behavior may be preserved in children with intellectual disabilities and that this ability does not implicate conscious awareness, nor does it depend on mature linguistic competence.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported in part by the National Institute of Psychobiology in Israel and by grant 13/92-94 to the first and the third authors from the Israeli Foundation for Research in Education.
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