An Examination of Verbal Working Memory Capacity in Children With Specific Language Impairment This study investigated verbal working memory capacity in children with specific language impairment (SLI). The task employed in this study was the Competing Language Processing Task (CLPT) developed by Gaulin and Campbell (1994) . A total of 40 school-age children participated in this investigation, including 20 with SLI and 20 normal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1999
An Examination of Verbal Working Memory Capacity in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Ellis Weismer
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Waisman Center University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Julia Evans
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Waisman Center University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Linda J. Hesketh
    Waisman Center University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1999
An Examination of Verbal Working Memory Capacity in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1249-1260. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1249
History: Received July 24, 1998 , Accepted April 7, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1249-1260. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1249
History: Received July 24, 1998; Accepted April 7, 1999

This study investigated verbal working memory capacity in children with specific language impairment (SLI). The task employed in this study was the Competing Language Processing Task (CLPT) developed by Gaulin and Campbell (1994) . A total of 40 school-age children participated in this investigation, including 20 with SLI and 20 normal language (NL) age-matched controls. Results indicated that the SLI and NL groups performed similarly in terms of true/false comprehension items, but that the children with SLI evidenced significantly poorer word recall than the NL controls, even when differences in nonverbal cognitive scores were statistically controlled. Distinct patterns of word-recall errors were observed for the SLI and NL groups, as well as different patterns of associations between CLPT word recall and performance on nonverbal cognitive and language measures. The findings are interpreted within the framework of a limited-capacity model of language processing.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, NIDCD Grants 1R29DC011 and 5P50DC02746. We gratefully acknowledge this support. We are extremely grateful to the Madison Metropolitan School District for their help in identifying participants and to the children and their parents for their participation in this project.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access