Effects of Treatment on Linguistic and Social Skills in Toddlers With Delayed Language Development This study investigated the effects of early language intervention on various linguistic and social skills of late-talking toddlers. The 21 children who participated in the investigation were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=11) or a control (delayed-treatment) group (n=10). The experimental group participated in a 12-week clinician-implemented language intervention ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   October 01, 1999
Effects of Treatment on Linguistic and Social Skills in Toddlers With Delayed Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shari Brand Robertson
    Department of Special Education and Clinical Services Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • Susan Ellis Weismer
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: srobert@grove.iup.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1999
Effects of Treatment on Linguistic and Social Skills in Toddlers With Delayed Language Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1234-1248. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1234
History: Received August 10, 1998 , Accepted March 31, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1234-1248. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1234
History: Received August 10, 1998; Accepted March 31, 1999

This study investigated the effects of early language intervention on various linguistic and social skills of late-talking toddlers. The 21 children who participated in the investigation were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=11) or a control (delayed-treatment) group (n=10). The experimental group participated in a 12-week clinician-implemented language intervention program. Groups were compared at pretest and posttest on five linguistic variables: Mean Length of Utterance, Total Number of Words, Number of Different Words, Lexical Repertoire, and Percentage of Intelligible Utterances, as well as on Socialization and Parental Stress. Significant group differences were found for each of the variables, indicating facilitative effects of the treatment. Notably, increases were observed in areas that were not specifically targeted by the intervention. Implications of these results are discussed with respect to considerations regarding clinical management decisions for toddlers with delayed language development.

Acknowledgments
This investigation was funded in part by a grant from the Doctoral Committee of the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Wisconsin–Madison. The authors wish to express their thanks to the parents and children who so willingly participated in this investigation. In addition, the authors are extremely grateful to the staff at Early Intervention Services for their enthusiastic cooperation. Portions of this work were presented at the Treatment Research in Communication Disorders–Special Interest Group (TRCD-SIG) Conference, Nashville, TN, in April 1998 and at the ASHA Convention in San Antonio, TX, in November 1998.
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