Voice and Speech Characteristics of Persons With Parkinson’s Disease Pre- and Post-Pallidotomy Surgery Preliminary Findings Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1999
Voice and Speech Characteristics of Persons With Parkinson’s Disease Pre- and Post-Pallidotomy Surgery
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Geralyn M. Schulz
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Florida Gainesville
  • Teri Peterson
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Florida Gainesville
  • Christine M. Sapienza
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Florida Gainesville
  • Melvin Greer
    Department of Neurology Health Science Center University of Florida Gainesville
  • William Friedman
    Department of Neurosurgery Health Science Center University of Florida Gainesville
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: schulz@csd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1999
Voice and Speech Characteristics of Persons With Parkinson’s Disease Pre- and Post-Pallidotomy Surgery
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1176-1194. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1176
History: Received November 18, 1998 , Accepted April 20, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1176-1194. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1176
History: Received November 18, 1998; Accepted April 20, 1999

Pallidotomy surgery, lesioning the globus pallidus internal, has been performed to alleviate Parkinsonian symptoms and drug-induced dyskinesias. Improvements in limb motor function have been reported in recent years following pallidotomy surgery. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine the effect of pallidotomy surgery on select voice and speech characteristics of 6 patients with Parkinson’s disease. Acoustic measures were analyzed pre-pallidotomy surgery and again at 3 months following surgery. Preliminary findings indicated that all participants demonstrated positive changes in at least one acoustic measure; 2 of the participants consistently demonstrated positive changes in phonatory and articulatory measures, whereas 3 participants did not consistently demonstrate positive changes postsurgery. The results are discussed relative to the differential effects observed across participants.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the participants in this study. The pallidotomy program at the University of Florida Health Science Center is supported in part through the generosity of the National Parkinson Foundation. We thank the Associate Editor, Michael Cannito, and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on earlier drafts of the paper.
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