An Acoustic Analysis of the Development of CV Coarticulation A Case Study Case Study
Case Study  |   October 01, 1999
An Acoustic Analysis of the Development of CV Coarticulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harvey M. Sussman
    University of Texas Austin
  • Celeste Duder
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Eileen Dalston
    University of Texas Austin
  • Antonina Cacciatore
    University of Texas Austin
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: sussman@mail.utexas.edu
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Case Study
Case Study   |   October 01, 1999
An Acoustic Analysis of the Development of CV Coarticulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1080-1096. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1080
History: Received September 21, 1998 , Accepted March 12, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1080-1096. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1080
History: Received September 21, 1998; Accepted March 12, 1999

This study analyzed stop consonant-vowel productions from babbling to meaningful speech in a single female child spanning the period from age 7 months to age 40 months. A total of 7,888 utterances (3,103 [bV], 3,236 [dV], and 1,549 [gV]) were analyzed to obtain frequencies at F2 onset and F2 at vocalic center for each utterance. A linear regression line (“locus equation”) was fit to the cluster of F2 coordinates per stop place category produced during each month. The slope of the regression lines provided a numerical index of vowel-induced coarticulation on consonant productions. Labial, alveolar, and velar CV productions followed distinct articulatory paths toward adult-like norms of coarticulation. Inferences about the gradual emergence of segmental independence of the consonant and vowel in the three stop place environments were made from locus equation scatterplots and mean F2 onset and F2 midvowel frequencies obtained across babbling, early words, and natural speech.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grant No. R01 DC2014 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to the first author. This research was made possible by the generosity of Drs. Peter MacNeilage and Barbara Davis, who made available to us their digital audiotapes of this child. The authors sincerely appreciate the constructive comments made by several anonymous reviewers and especially Susan Nittrouer. We would also like to acknowledge the invaluable insights provided by Peter MacNeilage and Barbara Davis to the interpretation of this data. Lastly, we would like to extend our thanks to “Baby C” for providing hours and hours (and hours) of engaging listening.
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