Acoustic Reflex Detection Using Wide-Band Acoustic Reflectance, Admittance, and Power Measurements The measurement of the acoustic reflex threshold is a basic component of the diagnostic audiological test battery that may subject patients to potentially harmful sound pressures. A wide-band acoustic impedance and reflectance system (D. H. Keefe, R. Ling, & J. C. Bulen, 1992) was investigated as a means of obtaining ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1999
Acoustic Reflex Detection Using Wide-Band Acoustic Reflectance, Admittance, and Power Measurements
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Patrick Feeney
    School of Hearing and Speech Sciences Ohio University Athens
  • Douglas H. Keefe
    School of Hearing and Speech Sciences Ohio University Athens
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: feeney@ohiou.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1999
Acoustic Reflex Detection Using Wide-Band Acoustic Reflectance, Admittance, and Power Measurements
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1029-1041. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1029
History: Received August 10, 1998 , Accepted March 29, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1999, Vol. 42, 1029-1041. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4205.1029
History: Received August 10, 1998; Accepted March 29, 1999

The measurement of the acoustic reflex threshold is a basic component of the diagnostic audiological test battery that may subject patients to potentially harmful sound pressures. A wide-band acoustic impedance and reflectance system (D. H. Keefe, R. Ling, & J. C. Bulen, 1992) was investigated as a means of obtaining reflex thresholds at a reduced level and as a means of providing a more complete characterization of the reflex than current clinical methods provide. Reflex thresholds obtained by measuring changes in wide-band admittance, reflectance, and power were at least 8 dB lower than those obtained with the standard clinical technique. These reflex-induced changes were accounted for by a simple oscillator model of the middle ear, assuming that the acoustic reflex results in an increase in stiffness. The results support further investigation of reflectance-based measures of the acoustic reflex as a clinical tool and as a means of studying the reflex mechanism.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants from the Ohio University Research Committee (00-10-5806), the Ohio University College of Health and Human Services Scholarly Activity Award (00-10-5912), and the NIH (P01 DC00520). The authors thank Jennifer Hoffman, Nicole Mitovich, and Kristen Smith for their assistance in data collection and analysis. We also thank Robert Margolis for helpful comments regarding the modeling of the effect of the acoustic reflex.
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