Effects of Imitative and Conversational Recasting Treatment on the Acquisition of Grammar in Children With Specific Language Impairment and Younger Language-Normal Children The purpose of the study was to compare the relative effectiveness of imitative treatment and conversational recast treatment in children with language impairment and in a group of children with normal language skills. Language treatment outcomes were compared between a group of older (4.7 to 6.7) specifically-language-impaired (SLI) children and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1996
Effects of Imitative and Conversational Recasting Treatment on the Acquisition of Grammar in Children With Specific Language Impairment and Younger Language-Normal Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Keith E. Nelson
    Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Stephen M. Camarata
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Janet Welsh
    Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Laura Butkovsky
    Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Mary Camarata
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Keith E. Nelson, PhD, Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, 414 Bruce V. Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802-3104.
    Contact author: Keith E. Nelson, PhD, Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, 414 Bruce V. Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802-3104.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1996
Effects of Imitative and Conversational Recasting Treatment on the Acquisition of Grammar in Children With Specific Language Impairment and Younger Language-Normal Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 850-859. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.850
History: Received April 18, 1995 , Accepted February 7, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 850-859. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.850
History: Received April 18, 1995; Accepted February 7, 1996

The purpose of the study was to compare the relative effectiveness of imitative treatment and conversational recast treatment in children with language impairment and in a group of children with normal language skills. Language treatment outcomes were compared between a group of older (4.7 to 6.7) specifically-language-impaired (SLI) children and a group of younger (2.2 to 4.2) language-normal (LN) children matched on language levels and on intervention targets. The results indicated: (a) Target acquisition was more rapid under conversational recast treatment for both groups. (b) This outcome held for targets absent initially (in pretreatment sampling and probing) as well as for initially partially mastered targets. (c) SLI children sometimes can learn grammatical structures as efficiently as language-normal children if similar language input is tailored to their specific developmental language levels. Implications of these findings for language treatment strategies with SLI children are discussed. Theoretical models compatible with the data also are considered.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Nancy Donelan McCall, Mindy Harmer, Cindy Carter, Christina Cosmides, Sarah Beckman, Katie McShane, and Laura Gordon-Mumane for assistance in data collection and coding. Cathy Agostinelli, Jeanie Ghaner, Barbara Safee, Mary Long, and Jennifer Eisenberg assisted on many assorted tasks in this project. Thanks are also extended to Martin Fujiki, Tom Klee, and an anonymous reviewer who provided detailed critiques of an earlier version of this manuscript. This project was supported in part by grant NS26437 from NIDCD of the National Institutes of Health and by an endowment to the second author from the Scottish Rite Foundation of Nashville.
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