Linear Predictive Coding Parameter Manipulation/Synthesis of Incorrectly Produced /r/ This study describes the manipulation and synthesis of LPC parameters to edit incorrectly produced utterances. In particular, it shows that formant frequencies can be manipulated to produce a consistent and reliable change in perception. It also demonstrates that this method can be used to produce quality synthesis of high-pitched voices. ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 1996
Linear Predictive Coding Parameter Manipulation/Synthesis of Incorrectly Produced /r/
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda I. Shuster
    West Virginia University Morgantown
  • Contact author: Linda I. Shuster, PO Box 6122, 805 Allen Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506. E-mail u5050@wvnvm.wvnet.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   August 01, 1996
Linear Predictive Coding Parameter Manipulation/Synthesis of Incorrectly Produced /r/
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 827-832. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.827
History: Received October 24, 1995 , Accepted March 14, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 827-832. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.827
History: Received October 24, 1995; Accepted March 14, 1996

This study describes the manipulation and synthesis of LPC parameters to edit incorrectly produced utterances. In particular, it shows that formant frequencies can be manipulated to produce a consistent and reliable change in perception. It also demonstrates that this method can be used to produce quality synthesis of high-pitched voices.

Acknowledgments
Supported in part by research grant 5 R03 DC 01742-02 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The author gratefully acknowledges B. Craig Dickson, Speech Technology Research LTD, for his comments and suggestions, Bill Wonderlin for the time and energy he spent in programming, and Kate Franklin, Denny Ruscello, and Marie Hillstrom for their help in listening to tapes. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL, in December 1995.
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