Effects of Age and Alzheimer's Disease on Recognition of Gated Spoken Words This study investigated the effects of normal aging and Alzheimer's disease on listeners' ability to recognize gated spoken words. Groups of healthy young adults, healthy older adults, and adults with Alzheimer's disease were presented isolated gated spoken words. Theoretical predictions of the Cohort model of spoken word recognition (Marslen-Wilson, 1984) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1996
Effects of Age and Alzheimer's Disease on Recognition of Gated Spoken Words
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy B. Marshall
    Department of Neurology Alzheimer's Disease Center University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Linda W. Duke
    Department of Psychology University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Amanda C. Walley
    Department of Psychology University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Contact author: Nancy B. Marshall, PhD, Communication Concepts & Consulting, Inc., 234 Aquarius Drive, Suite 116, Homewood, AL 35209.
    Contact author: Nancy B. Marshall, PhD, Communication Concepts & Consulting, Inc., 234 Aquarius Drive, Suite 116, Homewood, AL 35209.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1996
Effects of Age and Alzheimer's Disease on Recognition of Gated Spoken Words
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 724-733. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.724
History: Received January 30, 1995 , Accepted March 13, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 724-733. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.724
History: Received January 30, 1995; Accepted March 13, 1996

This study investigated the effects of normal aging and Alzheimer's disease on listeners' ability to recognize gated spoken words. Groups of healthy young adults, healthy older adults, and adults with Alzheimer's disease were presented isolated gated spoken words. Theoretical predictions of the Cohort model of spoken word recognition (Marslen-Wilson, 1984) were tested, employing both between-group and within-group comparisons. The findings for the young adults supported the Cohort model's predictions. The findings for the older adult groups revealed different effects for age and disease. These results are interpreted in relation to the theoretical predictions, the findings of previous gating studies, and differentiating age from disease-related changes in spoken word recognition.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a National Research Service Award from the NICHD/NCMRR (T32HD07420-04) to the first author, a pilot project grant from the NIH/NIA (PO1AG10163) to the first and second authors, and a grant from the NICHD (HD30398) to the third author. We thank James Flege for the use of his laboratory facilities, Kathy Pichora-Fuller, Chie Craig, and an anonymous reviewer for their editorial critiques. The first author extends special appreciation to Ray Elliott and Scott Richards for their support.
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