Generalizability of Speechreading Performance on Nonsense Syllables, Words, and Sentences Subjects With Normal Hearing Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1996
Generalizability of Speechreading Performance on Nonsense Syllables, Words, and Sentences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn E. Demorest
    University of Maryland Baltimore County
  • Lynne E. Bernstein
    Center for Auditory and Speech Sciences Gallaudet University
  • Gale P. DeHaven
    University of Maryland Baltimore County
  • Contact author: Marilyn E. Demorest, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Psychology, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21228-5398. E-mail: demorest@umbc2.umbc.edu
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1996
Generalizability of Speechreading Performance on Nonsense Syllables, Words, and Sentences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 697-713. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.697
History: Received July 30, 1995 , Accepted February 15, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1996, Vol. 39, 697-713. doi:10.1044/jshr.3904.697
History: Received July 30, 1995; Accepted February 15, 1996

Ninety-six adults with normal hearing viewed three types of recorded speechreading materials (consonant-vowel nonsense syllables, isolated words, and sentences) on 2 days. Responses to nonsense syllables were scored for syllables correct and syllable groups correct; responses to words and sentences were scored in terms of words correct, phonemes correct, and an estimate of visual distance between the stimulus and the response. Generalizability analysis was used to quantify sources of variability in performance. Subjects and test items were important sources of variability for all three types of materials; effects of talker and day of testing varied but were comparatively small. For each type of material, alternative models of test construction and test-score interpretation were evaluated through estimation of generalizability coefficients as a function of test length. Performance on nonsense syllables correlated about .50 with both word and sentence measures, whereas correlations between words and sentences typically exceeded .80.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIH Grant DC00695. The authors thank Kimberly Sayampanathan, Craig Grossman, Tracey Collins, and Paula Tucker for their assistance in data collection and data processing. The paper benefited from thorough and thoughtful reviews, for which the authors are grateful.
Descriptive statistics for individual items and analyses of variance for each type of material are available from the first author.
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