Delayed Predictive Accuracy of Narrative Recall After Traumatic Brain Injury Salience and Explicitness Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
Delayed Predictive Accuracy of Narrative Recall After Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary R. T. Kennedy, PhD
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Michael D. Nawrocki
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Mary R. T. Kennedy, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
    Contact author: Mary R. T. Kennedy, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: kenne047@tc.umn.edu
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
Delayed Predictive Accuracy of Narrative Recall After Traumatic Brain Injury
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 98-112. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/008)
History: Received April 11, 2002 , Accepted August 16, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 98-112. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/008)
History: Received April 11, 2002; Accepted August 16, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Fifteen adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 15 adults without brain injury listened to narratives, made delayed predictions of recall, and took a delayed recall test. Narrative questions differed by salience (main ideas, details) and explicitness (implied, stated) (R. H. Brookshire & L. E. Nicholas, 1993). TBI survivors recalled less than control participants regardless of question type. All participants recalled main ideas and implied information with greater accuracy than details and stated information. Predictive accuracy for recalling stated information was strong regardless of group. Participants were unable to predict recall for implied information. The materials-appropriate-processing (MAP) hypothesis proposes that predictive accuracy is biased by text type (i.e., predictive accuracy for recalling main ideas should be higher than for details when learning narratives). However, there were no differences in predictive accuracy for recalling main ideas and details, with both groups predicting recall modestly well. Controlling for explicitness appears to be an important variable for future metamemory text studies.

Acknowledgments
This study was partially funded as a Grant-in-Aid (#18409) awarded to the first author by the Office of the Vice President for Research and the Graduate School and the Bryng Bryngelson Communication Disorders Research Fund at the University of Minnesota. The authors wish to recognize the rehabilitation programs that provided referrals for this study and all the participants who gave of their time and effort. A special thanks is extended to Edward Carney, computer programmer; to Beth Brady, research assistant; and to Sandy Garcia-Berry, speech-language pathologist at The Courage Center, Golden Valley, MN. A portion of this study was conducted in partial fulfillment of the second author’s thesis at the University of Minnesota.
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