The Perception of "Sine-Wave Speech" by Adults With Developmental Dyslexia Numerous studies have shown that, as a group, children or adults with developmental dyslexia perceive isolated syllables or words abnormally. Continuous speech containing reduced acoustic information also might prove perceptually difficult to such listeners. They might, however, exploit the intact syntactic and semantic features present in whole utterances, thereby compensating ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
The Perception of "Sine-Wave Speech" by Adults With Developmental Dyslexia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Burton S. Rosner, PhD
    University of Oxford, England
  • Joel B. Talcott
    University of Oxford, England
  • Caroline Witton
    University of Oxford, England
  • James D. Hogg
    University of Oxford, England
  • Alexandra J. Richardson
    University of Oxford, England
  • Peter C. Hansen
    University of Oxford, England
  • John F. Stein
    University of Oxford, England
  • Contact author: B. S. Rosner, PhD, Phonetics Laboratory, 41 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF, England.
    Contact author: B. S. Rosner, PhD, Phonetics Laboratory, 41 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF, England.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: burton.rosner@phon.ox.ac.uk
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
The Perception of "Sine-Wave Speech" by Adults With Developmental Dyslexia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 68-79. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/006)
History: Received March 12, 2002 , Accepted July 31, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 68-79. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/006)
History: Received March 12, 2002; Accepted July 31, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Numerous studies have shown that, as a group, children or adults with developmental dyslexia perceive isolated syllables or words abnormally. Continuous speech containing reduced acoustic information also might prove perceptually difficult to such listeners. They might, however, exploit the intact syntactic and semantic features present in whole utterances, thereby compensating fully for impaired speech perception. "Sine-wave speech" sentences afford a test of these competing possibilities. The sentences contain only 4 frequency-modulated sine waves, lacking many acoustic cues present in natural speech. Adults with and without dyslexia were asked to orally reproduce 9 sine-wave utterances, each occurring in 4 immediately successive trials. Participants with dyslexia reported fewer words than did control listeners. Practice, phonological contrasts, and word position affected both groups similarly. Comprehension of sine-wave sentences seems impaired in many, but not all, adults with dyslexia. A reduced auditory memory capacity may contribute to this deficit.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by the Rodin Remediation Trust and by the Wellcome Trust. We thank Jonathan Winter for technical support and the late Nancy C. Waugh for numerous helpful comments on drafts of this article.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access