Article/Report  |   February 2003
Acoustic Startle Responses and Temperament in Individuals Who Stutter
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Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech
Article/Report   |   February 2003
Acoustic Startle Responses and Temperament in Individuals Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 233-240. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/018)
History: Received October 9, 2001 , Accepted September 24, 2002
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 233-240. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/018)
History: Received October 9, 2001; Accepted September 24, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Fourteen individuals who stutter and 14 individuals who do not stutter were presented with 10 bursts of white noise to assess the magnitude of their eyeblink responses as a measure of temperament. Both the magnitude of the eyeblink response to the initial noise burst and the mean of the 10 responses were significantly greater for the stuttering group. The Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis (R. M. Taylor & L. P. Morrison, 1996) did not distinguish between the two groups, but informal follow-up statistics indicated that the Nervous subscale showed a significant group difference. Scores on this subscale were also significantly positively correlated with the magnitude of the startle response. A discriminant analysis demonstrated that although both the startle response and the nervous trait differentiated the two groups, the startle response measures were more powerful in making this differentiation.

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