Kinematic Analyses of Speech, Orofacial Nonspeech, and Finger Movements in Stuttering and Nonstuttering Adults This work investigated the hypothesis that neuromotor differences between individuals who stutter and individuals who do not stutter are not limited to the movements involved in speech production. Kinematic data were obtained from gender- and age-matched stuttering (n=10) and nonstuttering (n=10) adults during speech movements, orofacial nonspeech movements, and finger ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
Kinematic Analyses of Speech, Orofacial Nonspeech, and Finger Movements in Stuttering and Nonstuttering Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ludo Max
    University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT and Haskins Laboratories New Haven, CT
  • Anthony J. Caruso
    Kent State University Kent, OH
  • Vincent L. Gracco
    McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada and Haskins Laboratories New Haven, CT
  • Contact author: Ludo Max, Department of Communication Sciences, University of Connecticut, 850 Bolton Road, Unit 1085, Storrs, CT 06269-1085.
    Contact author: Ludo Max, Department of Communication Sciences, University of Connecticut, 850 Bolton Road, Unit 1085, Storrs, CT 06269-1085.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: ludo.max@uconn.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
Kinematic Analyses of Speech, Orofacial Nonspeech, and Finger Movements in Stuttering and Nonstuttering Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 215-232. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/017)
History: Received March 1, 2002 , Accepted August 21, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 215-232. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/017)
History: Received March 1, 2002; Accepted August 21, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 55

This work investigated the hypothesis that neuromotor differences between individuals who stutter and individuals who do not stutter are not limited to the movements involved in speech production. Kinematic data were obtained from gender- and age-matched stuttering (n=10) and nonstuttering (n=10) adults during speech movements, orofacial nonspeech movements, and finger movements. All movements were performed in 4 conditions differing in sequence length and location of the target movement within the sequence. Results revealed statistically significant differences between the stuttering and nonstuttering individuals on several measures of lip and jaw closing (but not opening) movements during perceptually fluent speech. The magnitude of these differences varied across different levels of utterance length (larger differences during shorter utterances) and across different locations of the target movement within an utterance (larger differences close to the beginning). Results further revealed statistically significant differences between the stuttering and nonstuttering groups in finger flexion (but not extension) movement duration and peak velocity latency. Overall, findings suggest that differences between stuttering and nonstuttering individuals are not confined to the sensorimotor processes underlying speech production or even movements of the orofacial system in general. Rather, it appears that the groups show generalized differences in the duration of certain goal-directed movements across unrelated motor systems.

Acknowledgment
This research was funded, in part, by National Institutes of Health Grant DC 03102. It was completed as part of the first author’s doctoral dissertation at Kent State University. The authors gratefully acknowledge Peter B. Mueller, Gary S. Neiman, Anna Marie Schmidt, and Wayne E. Sinning for their contributions. Appreciation is also extended to Vicki Neading, Sally Butcher, and Dave Scarbrough for help with recruitment of participants, to Mike Sanders and John Alberton for technical support, and to Jim Fisher for assistance with software programming.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access