Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia During Speech Production The amplitude of the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was investigated during a reading aloud task to determine whether alterations in respiratory control during speech production affect the amplitude of RSA. Changes in RSA amplitude associated with speech were evaluated by comparing RSA amplitudes during reading aloud with those obtained during ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia During Speech Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kevin J. Reilly
    University of Washington Seattle
  • Christopher A. Moore
    University of Washington Seattle
  • Contact author: Kevin J. Reilly, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105-6246.
    Contact author: Kevin J. Reilly, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105-6246.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: kjreilly@u.washington.edu
Article Information
Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia During Speech Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 164-177. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/013)
History: Received March 5, 2002 , Accepted August 4, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2003, Vol. 46, 164-177. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/013)
History: Received March 5, 2002; Accepted August 4, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

The amplitude of the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was investigated during a reading aloud task to determine whether alterations in respiratory control during speech production affect the amplitude of RSA. Changes in RSA amplitude associated with speech were evaluated by comparing RSA amplitudes during reading aloud with those obtained during rest breathing. A third condition, silent reading, was included to control for potentially confounding effects of cardiovascular responses to cognitive processes involved in the process of reading. Calibrated respiratory kinematics, electrocardiograms (ECGs), and speech audio signals were recorded from 18 adults (9 men, 9 women) during 5-min trials of each condition. The results indicated that the increases in respiratory duration, lung volume, and inspiratory velocity associated with reading aloud were accompanied by similar increases in the amplitude of RSA. This finding provides support for the premise that sensorimotor pathways mediating metabolic respiration are actively modulated during speech production.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by Grants R01 DC00822 and T32 DC00033 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and by the Center for Mind, Brain, and Learning at the University of Washington.
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