Classification of Adults for Family Studies of Developmental Language Disorders A variety of approaches has been used to classify the status of adult subjects in familial studies of developmental language disorders. In this report, we directly compare the results of four different methods that appear in the research literature. Two of the approaches rely on case history reports, and two ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1996
Classification of Adults for Family Studies of Developmental Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elena Plante
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Kenneth Shenkman
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Melinda M. Clark
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Elena Plante, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, P.O. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0071.
    Contact author: Elena Plante, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, P.O. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0071.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 1996
Classification of Adults for Family Studies of Developmental Language Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 661-667. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.661
History: Received April 18, 1995 , Accepted December 8, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 661-667. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.661
History: Received April 18, 1995; Accepted December 8, 1995

A variety of approaches has been used to classify the status of adult subjects in familial studies of developmental language disorders. In this report, we directly compare the results of four different methods that appear in the research literature. Two of the approaches rely on case history reports, and two are performance-based methods. Subjects included 24 parents (12 mothers, 12 fathers) of children with developmental language disorders and 24 unrelated adult control subjects (12 female, 12 male) who completed case history items and standardized language testing designed for classification purposes. All classification methods identified more parents than control subjects as “affected.” However, classification by case history methods resulted in fewer affected adults than classification through standardized testing. This outcome suggests that the variability in classification rates in studies to date may be the result of method rather than subject sample differences.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) grant K080007, National Multipurpose Research and Training grant DC01409 from NIDCD, and by the Tucson Scottish Rite Charitable Foundation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access