SLI Subgroups: Interaction Between Discourse Constraints and Morphosyntactic Deficits A performance-based model was employed to investigate the impact of discourse demands on the pattern of morphosyntactic deficits exhibited by children with Specific Language Impairments (SLI). The pattern of grammatical errors varied with respect to discourse demands for children with good receptive language abilities but remained stable and independent of ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1996
SLI Subgroups: Interaction Between Discourse Constraints and Morphosyntactic Deficits
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julia L. Evans
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Contact author: Julia L Evans, PhD, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
    Contact author: Julia L Evans, PhD, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 1996
SLI Subgroups: Interaction Between Discourse Constraints and Morphosyntactic Deficits
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 655-660. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.655
History: Received January 31, 1995 , Accepted December 6, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 655-660. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.655
History: Received January 31, 1995; Accepted December 6, 1995

A performance-based model was employed to investigate the impact of discourse demands on the pattern of morphosyntactic deficits exhibited by children with Specific Language Impairments (SLI). The pattern of grammatical errors varied with respect to discourse demands for children with good receptive language abilities but remained stable and independent of changes in discourse demands for children with both expressive and receptive deficits. These findings suggest distinct deficit profiles for subgroups of children with SLI differing in receptive language abilities that are not evident when syntactic skills are investigated outside the context of ongoing spontaneous discourse.

Acknowledgments
This work is supported in part by Grant 5K08-DC900068 (Computational Models of Language Disorders) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. Special thanks is extended to Holly Craig and Brian MacWhinney for their insightful comments and careful reading of the manuscript.
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