Differences in Children’s Sound Production When Speaking With a Cochlear Implant Turned On and Turned Off Twenty children who have worn a Cochlear Corporation cochlear implant for an average of 33.6 months participated in a device-on/off experiment. They spoke 14 monosyllabic words three times each after having not worn their cochlear implant speech processors for several hours. They then spoke the same speech sample again with ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1996
Differences in Children’s Sound Production When Speaking With a Cochlear Implant Turned On and Turned Off
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Tye-Murray
    Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City
  • Linda Spencer
    Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City
  • Elizabeth Gilbert Bedia
    Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City
  • George Woodworth
    Department of Statistics, The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Currently affiliated with Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, MO
    Currently affiliated with Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, MO×
  • Currently affiliated with Pinellas Co. School District, St. Petersburg, FL
    Currently affiliated with Pinellas Co. School District, St. Petersburg, FL×
  • Contact author: Nancy Tye-Murray, PhD, Central Institute for the Deaf, 818 S. Euclid, St. Louis, MO 63110.
    Contact author: Nancy Tye-Murray, PhD, Central Institute for the Deaf, 818 S. Euclid, St. Louis, MO 63110.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   June 01, 1996
Differences in Children’s Sound Production When Speaking With a Cochlear Implant Turned On and Turned Off
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 604-610. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.604
History: Received April 19, 1995 , Accepted January 4, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 604-610. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.604
History: Received April 19, 1995; Accepted January 4, 1996

Twenty children who have worn a Cochlear Corporation cochlear implant for an average of 33.6 months participated in a device-on/off experiment. They spoke 14 monosyllabic words three times each after having not worn their cochlear implant speech processors for several hours. They then spoke the same speech sample again with their cochlear implants turned on. The utterances were phonetically transcribed by speech-language pathologists. On average, no difference between speaking conditions on indices of vowel height, vowel place, initial consonant place, initial consonant voicing, or final consonant voicing was found. Comparisons based on a narrow transcription of the speech samples revealed no difference between the two speaking conditions. Children who were more intelligible were no more likely to show a degradation in their speech production in the device-off condition than children who were less intelligible. In the device-on condition, children sometimes nasalized their vowels and inappropriately aspirated their consonants. Their tendency to nasalize vowels and aspirate initial consonants might reflect an attempt to increase proprioceptive feedback, which would provide them with a greater awareness of their speaking behavior.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported (in part) by research grant awarded to the Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa (# 2 P50 DC 00242) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health; grant RR00059 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program, Division of Research Resources, NIH, the Lions Clubs International Foundation; and the Iowa Lions Foundation. The audiological data reported in this investigation were collected in an experimental protocol directed by Dr. Richard S. Tyler. We thank Holly Fryauf-Bertschy for administering the audiological tests and Melissa Figland for her diligence in transcribing. We thank Karen Kirk for her contributions in the early stages of this work.
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