The Specific Relation Between Perception and Production Errors for Place of Articulation in Developmental Apraxia of Speech Developmental apraxia of speech is a disorder of phonological and articulatory output processes. However, it has been suggested that perceptual deficits may contribute to the disorder. Identification and discrimination tasks offer a fine-grained assessment of central auditory and phonetic functions. Seventeen children with developmental apraxia (mean age 8:9, years:months) and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1996
The Specific Relation Between Perception and Production Errors for Place of Articulation in Developmental Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul Groenen
    University Hospital Nijmegen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Child Neurology Center, Institute of Medical Psychology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Ben Maassen
    University Hospital Nijmegen, Child Neurology Center, Institute of Medical Psychology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Thom Crul
    University Hospital Nijmegen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Child Neurology Center, Institute of Medical Psychology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Geert Thoonen
    University Hospital Nijmegen, Child Neurology Center, Institute of Medical Psychology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Contact author: Paul Groenen, University Hospital Nijmegen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands. E-mail: kno_pg@aznvx1.azn.nl
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1996
The Specific Relation Between Perception and Production Errors for Place of Articulation in Developmental Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 468-482. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.468
History: Received February 22, 1995 , Accepted January 10, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1996, Vol. 39, 468-482. doi:10.1044/jshr.3903.468
History: Received February 22, 1995; Accepted January 10, 1996

Developmental apraxia of speech is a disorder of phonological and articulatory output processes. However, it has been suggested that perceptual deficits may contribute to the disorder. Identification and discrimination tasks offer a fine-grained assessment of central auditory and phonetic functions. Seventeen children with developmental apraxia (mean age 8:9, years:months) and 16 control children (mean age 8:0) were administered tests of identification and discrimination of resynthesized and synthesized monosyllabic words differing in place-of-articulation of the initial voiced stop consonants. The resynthetic and synthetic words differed in the intensity of the third formant, a variable potentially enlarging their clinical value. The results of the identification task showed equal slopes for both subject groups, which indicates no phonetic processing deficit in developmental apraxia of speech. The hypothesized effect of the manipulation of the intensity of the third formant of the stimuli was not substantiated. However, the children with apraxia demonstrated poorer discrimination than the control children, which suggests affected auditory processing. Furthermore, analyses of discrimination performance and articulation data per apraxic subject demonstrated a specific relation between the degree to which auditory processing is affected and the frequency of place-of-articulation substitutions in production. This indicates the interdependence of perception and production. The results also suggest that the use of perceptual tasks has significant clinical value.

Acknowledgments
The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) is gratefully acknowledged for funding this project. This research was conducted while Paul Groenen was supported by a PSYCHON-grant from this organization (560-256-047) awarded to Dr. Ben Maassen and Dr. Thorn Crul. We would also like to thank Henk Loman for help in the construction of the synthetic stimuli and Henriet Ruuls and Jan Wit for their cooperation in the testing of the children. Finally, we want to thank the children and teachers of the special schools Martinus van Beekschool (Nijmegen), Dr. Bosschool (Arnhem), De Horst (Eindhoven), and Mgr. Terwindtschool (Groes-beek) and the regular school De Piekenstulp (Wijchen) for their cooperation.
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