Influence of Hearing Loss on the Perceptual Strategies of Children and Adults To accommodate growing vocabularies, young children are thought to modify their perceptual weights as they gain experience with speech and language. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the perceptual weights of children and adults with hearing loss differ from those of their normal-hearing counterparts. Adults and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2002
Influence of Hearing Loss on the Perceptual Strategies of Children and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea L. Pittman, PhD
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • Patricia G. Stelmachowicz
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • Dawna E. Lewis
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • Brenda M. Hoover
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
  • Contact author: Andrea Pittman, PhD, Boys Town National Research Hospital, 555 N. 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131. E-mail: pittmana@boystown.org
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2002
Influence of Hearing Loss on the Perceptual Strategies of Children and Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1276-1284. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/102)
History: Received September 14, 2001 , Accepted March 21, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1276-1284. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/102)
History: Received September 14, 2001; Accepted March 21, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

To accommodate growing vocabularies, young children are thought to modify their perceptual weights as they gain experience with speech and language. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the perceptual weights of children and adults with hearing loss differ from those of their normal-hearing counterparts. Adults and children with normal hearing and with hearing loss served as participants. Fricative and vowel segments within consonant-vowel-consonant stimuli were presented at randomly selected levels under two conditions: unaltered and with the formant transition removed. Overall performance for each group was calculated as a function of segment level. Perceptual weights were also calculated for each group using point-biserial correlation coefficients that relate the level of each segment to performance. Results revealed child-adult differences in overall performance and also revealed an effect of hearing loss. Despite these performance differences, the pattern of perceptual weights was similar across all four groups for most conditions.

Acknowledgments
This project was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health. The authors would like to thank Susan Nittrouer, Kathy Beauchaine, and Patricia Dorn for their comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript.
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