Presbyacusis and the Auditory Brainstem Response Age-related hearing loss (ARHL or presbyacusis) is an increasingly common form of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) as a result of changing demographics, and the auditory brainstem response (ABR) is a common experimental and clinical tool in audiology and neurology. Some of the changes that occur in the aging auditory system ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2002
Presbyacusis and the Auditory Brainstem Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Flint A. Boettcher, PhD
    Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Medical University of South Carolina Charleston
  • Contact author: Flint A. Boettcher, PhD, 39 Sabin Street, P.O. Box 250150, Charleston, SC 29425. E-mail: boettcfa@musc.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2002
Presbyacusis and the Auditory Brainstem Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1249-1261. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/100)
History: Received June 25, 2001 , Accepted February 27, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1249-1261. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/100)
History: Received June 25, 2001; Accepted February 27, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 44

Age-related hearing loss (ARHL or presbyacusis) is an increasingly common form of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) as a result of changing demographics, and the auditory brainstem response (ABR) is a common experimental and clinical tool in audiology and neurology. Some of the changes that occur in the aging auditory system may significantly influence the interpretation of the ABR in comparison to the ABRs of younger adults. The approach of this review will be to integrate physiological and histopathological data from human and animal studies to provide a better understanding of the array of age-related changes in the ABR and to determine how age-related changes in the auditory system may influence how the ABR should be interpreted in presbyacusis. Data will be described in terms of thresholds, latencies, and amplitudes, as well as more complex auditory functions such as masking and temporal processing. Included in the review of data will be an attempt to differentiate between age-related effects that may strictly be due to threshold elevation from those that may be due to the aging process.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to thank Judy Dubno for providing comments on this manuscript and Elizabeth Poth, Lois Matthews, and Nancy Smythe for providing several illustrations. Portions of this work were supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01-AG15705 from the National Institute on Aging and P50-DC00422 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Portions of this work were presented at the XIV International Auditory Evoked Response Study Group Meeting in Tromsø, Norway, in June 1999.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access