Effects of Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching and Parent Responsivity Education on Dyads Involving Children With Intellectual Disabilities This study tested the effect of a method of facilitating prelinguistic communication on parents' responsivity and children's communication and productive language development. The method involved Responsivity education for the parents and Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching for the children (RPMT). Thirty-nine prelinguistic toddlers with intellectual disabilities and their primary caregivers participated in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2002
Effects of Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching and Parent Responsivity Education on Dyads Involving Children With Intellectual Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul J. Yoder, PhD
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Contact author: Paul Yoder, PhD, Peabody Box 328, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203. E-mail: paul.yoder@vanderbilt.edu
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Early Identification & Intervention / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2002
Effects of Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching and Parent Responsivity Education on Dyads Involving Children With Intellectual Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1158-1174. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/094)
History: Received February 26, 2002 , Accepted June 19, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1158-1174. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/094)
History: Received February 26, 2002; Accepted June 19, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 89

This study tested the effect of a method of facilitating prelinguistic communication on parents' responsivity and children's communication and productive language development. The method involved Responsivity education for the parents and Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching for the children (RPMT). Thirty-nine prelinguistic toddlers with intellectual disabilities and their primary caregivers participated in this study. Parent-child pairs were randomly assigned to either the RPMT group or a control group. Communication and language were assessed at study entry and 6, 9, and 12 months later. RPMT facilitated parental responsivity in the posttreatment period. The effect of RPMT on growth rate of child-initiated comments (i.e., the most common type of initiating joint attention) varied by pretreatment measures of that variable. The effect of RPMT on growth rate of child-initiated requests (i.e., the most common type of initiating behavior regulation) varied by presence or absence of Down syndrome. Finally, the effect of RPMT on growth of productive language varied by pretreatment frequency of canonical vocal communication. Recommended alterations in PMT and implications for defining which nonspeaking children are appropriate for prelinguistic goals and treatment were discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) grant R01-34520, which was awarded to the authors. The work was also supported by NICHD core grant HD15052, which supports the John F. Kennedy Center at Vanderbilt University. Thanks are given for the work of the research staff (Ann Edwards, Dawn Garcia, Melanee Horton, Melanie Jacobs, Melanie Jarzynka, Aimee McKey, Lisa Stepp, Carole Pickett, and Hope Vanbeselaere) and families who participated in this research.
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