A Longitudinal Investigation of Reading Outcomes in Children With Language Impairments This investigation examined the reading outcomes of children with language impairments (LI). A large subsample of children who participated in an epidemiologic study of language impairments in kindergarten (J. B. Tomblin, N. Records, P. Buckwalter, X. Zhang, E. Smith, & M. O'Brien, 1997) was followed into second and fourth grades. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2002
A Longitudinal Investigation of Reading Outcomes in Children With Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hugh W. Catts, PhD
    University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center Kansas City
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Xuyang Zhang
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: Hugh W. Catts, PhD, University of Kansas, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, 1000 Sunnyside Ave., Lawrence, KS 66045. E-mail: catts@ku.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2002
A Longitudinal Investigation of Reading Outcomes in Children With Language Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1142-1157. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/093)
History: Received November 27, 2001 , Accepted June 12, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2002, Vol. 45, 1142-1157. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/093)
History: Received November 27, 2001; Accepted June 12, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 335

This investigation examined the reading outcomes of children with language impairments (LI). A large subsample of children who participated in an epidemiologic study of language impairments in kindergarten (J. B. Tomblin, N. Records, P. Buckwalter, X. Zhang, E. Smith, & M. O'Brien, 1997) was followed into second and fourth grades. Participants' language, reading, and nonverbal cognitive abilities were assessed. Results indicated that children with LI in kindergarten were at a high risk for reading disabilities in second and fourth grades. This risk was higher for children with a nonspecific language impairment (nonverbal and language deficits) than for those with a specific language impairment (deficits in language alone). Children with LI in kindergarten who had improved in spoken language abilities by second and fourth grades had better reading outcomes than those with persistent language impairments. Also, children's literacy knowledge/experience in kindergarten and their initial reading achievement in second grade were good predictors of subsequent reading outcomes.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (grant #1-P50-DC02726-04). The completion of this study was aided considerably by a valuable research team, comprising the following: Paula Buckwalter, Marlea O'Brien, Connie Ferguson, Jodi Schwartz, and Amy Kundel.
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