Article/Report  |   August 1999
Grammaticality Judgments of an Extended Optional Infinitive Grammar
Author Notes
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language
Article/Report   |   August 1999
Grammaticality Judgments of an Extended Optional Infinitive Grammar
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research August 1999, Vol.42, 943-961. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.943
History: Accepted 08 Feb 1999 , Received 20 Apr 1998
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research August 1999, Vol.42, 943-961. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.943
History: Accepted 08 Feb 1999 , Received 20 Apr 1998

This study reports on the outcomes of an investigation designed to evaluate competing accounts of the nature of the grammatical limitations of children with specific language impairment (SLI) with a new comprehension measure involving well-formedness judgments. It is a follow-up to the longitudinal study of Rice, Wexler, and Hershberger (1998), which reported on the production of grammatical morphemes by young children with SLI and 2 control groups of children, one at equivalent levels of mean length of utterance at the outset of the study, the other of equivalent age. In this investigation, we report on grammaticality judgment measures collected from the same 3 groups of children over a period of 2 years for 5 times of measurement. It is the first longitudinal study of grammaticality judgments of children with SLI. The findings show that children's grammatical judgments parallel their productions: Children with SLI can make fine-tuned grammatical judgments to reject morphosyntactic errors they are unlikely to commit, whereas they accept morphosyntactic errors that they are likely to produce. The findings support the extended optional infinitive (EOI) account of morphosyntactic limitation based in underlying grammatical representations and do not support accounts of input processing deficits or production constraints.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access

Related Articles

Identification of Specific Language Impairment in Bilingual Children: I. Assessment in English
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research December 2013, Vol.56, 1813-1823. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0056)
Children's Marking of Verbal –s by Nonmainstream English Dialect and Clinical Status
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology November 2013, Vol.22, 604-614. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0122)
Predictors of Second Language Acquisition in Latino Children With Specific Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology February 2012, Vol.21, 64-77. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/10-0090)
Lexical and Grammatical Associations in Sequential Bilingual Preschoolers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2010, Vol.53, 684-698. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0126)
Judgments of Omitted BE and DO in Questions as Extended Finiteness Clinical Markers of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) to 15 Years: A Study of Growth and Asymptote
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research December 2009, Vol.52, 1417-1433. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0171)