The Relationship Between Prelinguistic Vocalization and Later Expressive Vocabulary in Young Children With Developmental Delay This study tested the relationship between prelinguistic vocalization and expressive vocabulary 1 year later in young children with mild to moderate developmental delays. Three vocalization variables were tested: rate of all vocalization, rate of vocalizations with consonants, and rate of vocalizations used interactively. The 58 toddlers in the study were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 1999
The Relationship Between Prelinguistic Vocalization and Later Expressive Vocabulary in Young Children With Developmental Delay
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca B. McCathren
    University of Missouri Columbia
  • Paul J. Yoder
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Rebecca B. McCathren, PhD, Dept. of Special Education, University of Missouri–Columbia, 307 Townsend Hall, Columbia, MO 65211.
    Contact author: Rebecca B. McCathren, PhD, Dept. of Special Education, University of Missouri–Columbia, 307 Townsend Hall, Columbia, MO 65211.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: spedrm@showme.missouri.edu
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 1999
The Relationship Between Prelinguistic Vocalization and Later Expressive Vocabulary in Young Children With Developmental Delay
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 915-924. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.915
History: Received February 2, 1998 , Accepted December 22, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 915-924. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.915
History: Received February 2, 1998; Accepted December 22, 1998

This study tested the relationship between prelinguistic vocalization and expressive vocabulary 1 year later in young children with mild to moderate developmental delays. Three vocalization variables were tested: rate of all vocalization, rate of vocalizations with consonants, and rate of vocalizations used interactively. The 58 toddlers in the study were 17–34 months old, not sensory impaired, and had Bayley Mental Development Indices (Bayley, 1969; Bayley, 1993) from 35–85. In addition, the children had fewer than 3 words in their expressive vocabularies and during classroom observation each showed at least one instance of intentional prelinguistic communication before testing. Selected sections of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales procedures (CSBS; Wetherby & Prizant, 1993) were administered at the beginning and at the end of the study. The vocal measures were obtained in the initial CSBS session. One measure of expressive vocabulary was obtained in the CSBS session at the end of the study. In addition, expressive vocabulary was measured in a nonstructured play session at the end of the study. We predicted that rate of vocalization, rate of vocalizations with consonants, and rate of vocalizations used interactively would all be positively related to later expressive vocabulary. The results confirmed the predictions.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grants T32HDO7226 and RO1HD27549 and United States Department of Education Grant HO23C20152. The views expressed are solely those of the authors.
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