Article/Report  |   August 1999
The Relationship Between Prelinguistic Vocalization and Later Expressive Vocabulary in Young Children With Developmental Delay
Author Notes
Development / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article/Report   |   August 1999
The Relationship Between Prelinguistic Vocalization and Later Expressive Vocabulary in Young Children With Developmental Delay
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research August 1999, Vol.42, 915-924. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.915
History: Accepted 22 Dec 1998 , Received 02 Feb 1998
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research August 1999, Vol.42, 915-924. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.915
History: Accepted 22 Dec 1998 , Received 02 Feb 1998

This study tested the relationship between prelinguistic vocalization and expressive vocabulary 1 year later in young children with mild to moderate developmental delays. Three vocalization variables were tested: rate of all vocalization, rate of vocalizations with consonants, and rate of vocalizations used interactively. The 58 toddlers in the study were 17–34 months old, not sensory impaired, and had Bayley Mental Development Indices (Bayley, 1969; Bayley, 1993) from 35–85. In addition, the children had fewer than 3 words in their expressive vocabularies and during classroom observation each showed at least one instance of intentional prelinguistic communication before testing. Selected sections of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales procedures (CSBS; Wetherby & Prizant, 1993) were administered at the beginning and at the end of the study. The vocal measures were obtained in the initial CSBS session. One measure of expressive vocabulary was obtained in the CSBS session at the end of the study. In addition, expressive vocabulary was measured in a nonstructured play session at the end of the study. We predicted that rate of vocalization, rate of vocalizations with consonants, and rate of vocalizations used interactively would all be positively related to later expressive vocabulary. The results confirmed the predictions.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access

Related Articles

Randomized Comparison of Augmented and Nonaugmented Language Interventions for Toddlers With Developmental Delays and Their Parents
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2010, Vol.53, 350-364. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0156)
Using Developmental Trajectories to Understand Developmental Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2009, Vol.52, 336-358. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0144)
Vocabulary Gain among Children with Language Disorders: Contributions of Children's Behavior Regulation and Emotionally-Supportive Environments
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology March 2014, Vol., No Pagination Specified. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-12-0148
Longitudinal Analysis of Receptive Vocabulary Growth in Young Spanish English–Speaking Children From Migrant Families
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools January 2014, Vol.45, 40-51. doi:10.1044/2013_LSHSS-12-0104
Unspun
The ASHA Leader December 2013, Vol.18, 48-53. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR2.18122013.48