Altered Auditory Feedback and Stuttering A Postscript to Armson and Stuart (1998) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   August 1999
Altered Auditory Feedback and Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    CUNY Brooklyn College Brooklyn, NY
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   August 1999
Altered Auditory Feedback and Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 910-911. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.910
History: Received July 15, 1998 , Accepted February 24, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 910-911. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.910
History: Received July 15, 1998; Accepted February 24, 1999
In their recent contribution, Armson and Stuart (1998)  documented the fact that stuttering is reduced in many subjects by delayed, masked, or frequency-altered auditory feedback. Even amplified feedback may have some of the same power (Martin, Johnson, Siegel, & Haroldson, 1985). It is by now a plausible inference that virtually any marked change in the way people who stutter perceive themselves to be speaking may render them fluent. If so, there is a striking parallel to another welldocumented observation: Virtually any change subjects make in their manner of speaking usually eliminates their stuttering (Bloodstein, 1995). The purpose of this letter is to suggest that the parallelism is no mere coincidence.
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