Effects of Time-Interval Judgment Training on Real-Time Measurement of Stuttering The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a previously developed interval-based training program could improve judges' stuttering event judgments. Two groups of judges made real-time stuttering event judgments (computer-mouse button presses) in 3 to 6 trials before the response-contingent judgment training program and in another 3 to 6 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 1999
Effects of Time-Interval Judgment Training on Real-Time Measurement of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of Georgia Athens
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 556 Aderhold Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606.
    Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 556 Aderhold Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: acordes@coe.uga.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 1999
Effects of Time-Interval Judgment Training on Real-Time Measurement of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 862-879. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.862
History: Received June 24, 1998 , Accepted February 16, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 862-879. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.862
History: Received June 24, 1998; Accepted February 16, 1999

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a previously developed interval-based training program could improve judges' stuttering event judgments. Two groups of judges made real-time stuttering event judgments (computer-mouse button presses) in 3 to 6 trials before the response-contingent judgment training program and in another 3 to 6 trials after training, for recordings of 9 adults who stuttered. Their judgments were analyzed in terms of number of stuttering events, duration of stuttering, and 5-s intervals of speech that could be categorized as judged (or not judged) to contain stuttering. Results showed (a) changes in the amount of stuttering identified by the judges; (b) improved correspondence between the judges' identifications of stuttering events and interval-based standards previously developed from judgments made by experienced, authoritative judges; (c) improved correspondence between interval-based analyses of the judges' stuttering judgments and the previously developed standards; (d) improved intrajudge agreement; (e) improved interjudge agreement; and (f) convergence between the 2 judge groups, for samples and speakers used during training tasks and also for other speakers. Some implications of these findings for developing standardized procedures for the real-time measurement of stuttering are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Authorship is equal. The authors express their appreciation to Richard Moglia and Martin Kilgo for expert technical and programming assistance; to the many students who served as subjects in this study and in an earlier pilot version of this study; and to Stacy Silverman and Melinda Gandara, who assisted with data collection for these studies. This research was supported by Grant R01-DC00060 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders, awarded to R. J. Ingham. Further information about the SMAAT program may be obtained from R. J. Ingham (email address: rjingham@ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu).
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