Acoustic Examination of Preterm and Full-Term Infant Cries The Long-Time Average Spectrum Research Article
Research Article  |   August 1999
Acoustic Examination of Preterm and Full-Term Infant Cries
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alexander M. Goberman
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Michael P. Robb
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Contact author: Alexander Goberman, Dept. of Communication Sciences, 850 Bolton Rd., U-85, Storrs, CT, 06269.
    Contact author: Alexander Goberman, Dept. of Communication Sciences, 850 Bolton Rd., U-85, Storrs, CT, 06269.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: amg93001@uconnvm.uconn.edu
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 1999
Acoustic Examination of Preterm and Full-Term Infant Cries
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 850-861. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.850
History: Received June 25, 1998 , Accepted February 10, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1999, Vol. 42, 850-861. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4204.850
History: Received June 25, 1998; Accepted February 10, 1999

The acoustic characteristics of crying behavior displayed in 2 groups of newborn infants are reported. The crying episodes of 10 full-term and 10 preterm infants were audio recorded and analyzed with regard to the long-time average spectrum (LTAS) characteristics. An LTAS display was created for each infant's non-partitioned crying episode, as well as for 3 equidurational partitions of the crying episode. Measures of first spectral peak, mean spectral energy, and spectral tilt were revealing of differences between full-term and preterm infants' non-partitioned crying episodes. In addition, the full-term infants demonstrated significant changes in their crying behavior across partitions, whereas the preterm infants changed little across the crying episode. Discussion focuses on possible differences between full-term and preterm infants in their neurophysiological maturity, and the subsequent impact on their speech development. The importance of examining entire crying episodes when evaluating the crying behavior of infants is also discussed.

Acknowledgments
This project was undertaken by the first author to partially fulfill the requirements for the MA degree at the University of Connecticut. The second author served as advisor. We wish to thank Drs. Anthony Cacace, Harvey Gilbert, Jay Lerman, and Ken Randolph for their helpful suggestions.
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