Persistence of Non-Standard Dialect in School-Age Children This study investigated the persistence of non-standard dialect production among 114 African American and White children in grades 3,5, and 7. A dialect shift premise suggests that a large and uniform decline in dialectal features occurs in the language of school-age children. Three experimental tasks were administered. The results indicated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1996
Persistence of Non-Standard Dialect in School-Age Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gale J. Isaacs
    Shaw University, Raleigh, NC
  • Contact author: Gale J. Isaacs, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Shaw University, 118 E. South Street, Raleigh, NC 27601.
    Contact author: Gale J. Isaacs, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Shaw University, 118 E. South Street, Raleigh, NC 27601.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1996
Persistence of Non-Standard Dialect in School-Age Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 434-441. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.434
History: Received July 29, 1994 , Accepted September 11, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 434-441. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.434
History: Received July 29, 1994; Accepted September 11, 1995

This study investigated the persistence of non-standard dialect production among 114 African American and White children in grades 3,5, and 7. A dialect shift premise suggests that a large and uniform decline in dialectal features occurs in the language of school-age children. Three experimental tasks were administered. The results indicated that dialect awareness and discrimination increased as grade in school increased; a dialect shift occurred between grades 3 and 5; non-standard dialect production and comprehension of standard dialect were not associated; and that there was no difference in non-standard dialect production among African American and White students.

Acknowledgments
This study was based in part on a doctoral dissertation submitted to The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This manuscript was prepared while the author was a post-doctoral fellow at The University of Memphis, School of Audiology and Speech Pathology. Appreciation is expressed to Karen Pollock, PhD, for her mentor-ship; to Alan Kamhi, PhD, for his editorial expertise; and to Joyce Harris, PhD, for her commentary and unconditional support. The preparation of this manuscript was supported in part by OSERS grant #H029D10070.
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