Assessment Information for Predicting Upcoming Change in Language Production Initial language assessments are used not only to determine the presence of a language problem and establish eligibility for intervention, but also to provide information about a child’s readiness for immediate change in language growth. This study explored static assessment profiling (specific variables and discrepancies in performance) and dynamic assessment ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1996
Assessment Information for Predicting Upcoming Change in Language Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lesley B. Olswang
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Barbara A. Bain
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Idaho State University, Pocatello
  • Contact author: Lesley B. Olswang, University of Washington, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105-6246. E-mail: lolswang@u.washington.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1996
Assessment Information for Predicting Upcoming Change in Language Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 414-423. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.414
History: Received January 20, 1995 , Accepted August 30, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 414-423. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.414
History: Received January 20, 1995; Accepted August 30, 1995

Initial language assessments are used not only to determine the presence of a language problem and establish eligibility for intervention, but also to provide information about a child’s readiness for immediate change in language growth. This study explored static assessment profiling (specific variables and discrepancies in performance) and dynamic assessment results to determine their relative effectiveness for predicting immediate change. Correlation data were used to examine how well each assessment measure predicted upcoming language production changes for children with specific expressive language impairment. Results indicated that dynamic assessment outcomes were most highly correlated with immediate language growth, followed by discrepancy in receptive and expressive language age. Findings are discussed in terms of their clinical and theoretical importance.

Acknowledgments
This paper was originally presented in part at the Symposium on Child Language Disorders Research, the University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1992. The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, Grant # R29-DC00431. Preparation of the manuscript was supported in part by a Fulbright Award granted to Dr. Olswang, Fulbright Commission, United States and United Kingdom, September 1994–February 1995. The authors wish to express their appreciation to Glenn Johnson, Susan Oblak, Pamela Crooke, and Steven Long for their help at various stages in data collection, reduction, and analysis.
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