The Problem of Generalizing to a Language Population: A "Random" Controversy The rationale behind the use of item statistics as well as objections to their use are reviewed. It is argued that investigators conducting language research with disordered populations should follow the example of those conducting language research with normal populations and consider calculating item statistics if they wish their results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1996
The Problem of Generalizing to a Language Population: A "Random" Controversy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol L. Leonard
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Darla Orchard
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Contact author: Carol Leonard, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A8, Canada.
    Contact author: Carol Leonard, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A8, Canada.×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1996
The Problem of Generalizing to a Language Population: A "Random" Controversy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 406-413. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.406
History: Received February 2, 1995 , Accepted August 30, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 406-413. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.406
History: Received February 2, 1995; Accepted August 30, 1995

The rationale behind the use of item statistics as well as objections to their use are reviewed. It is argued that investigators conducting language research with disordered populations should follow the example of those conducting language research with normal populations and consider calculating item statistics if they wish their results to generalize beyond the specific items tested.

Acknowledgments
This paper was supported by a fellowship from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to both Carol Leonard and Darla Orchard. Carol Leonard was also supported by a McGill Major Fellowship and a Faculty of Medicine Internal Studentship from McGill University. The authors wish to express thanks to Gloria Waters, Rachel Mayberry, and Shari Baum for their insightful comments on earlier drafts of the paper.
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