Fluency Effect of Frequency Alterations of Plus/Minus One-Half and One-Quarter Octave Shifts in Auditory Feedback of People Who Stutter The effect of frequency alterations in auditory feedback of people who stutter on stuttering frequency was investigated. Twelve participants who stutter read aloud under nonaltered auditory feedback (NAF) and four conditions of frequency-altered feedback ([FAF], plus/minus one-half and one-quarter octaves) at normal and fast speech rates. Stuttering frequency was significantly ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 1996
Fluency Effect of Frequency Alterations of Plus/Minus One-Half and One-Quarter Octave Shifts in Auditory Feedback of People Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Stuart
    Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Joseph Kalinowski
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Joy Armson
    School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Robert Stenstrom
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Kathleen Jones
    State University of New York at Geneseo
  • Contact author: Andrew Stuart, PhD, Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1. E-mail: astuart@ac.dal.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 1996
Fluency Effect of Frequency Alterations of Plus/Minus One-Half and One-Quarter Octave Shifts in Auditory Feedback of People Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 396-401. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.396
History: Received July 18, 1995 , Accepted September 20, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 396-401. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.396
History: Received July 18, 1995; Accepted September 20, 1995

The effect of frequency alterations in auditory feedback of people who stutter on stuttering frequency was investigated. Twelve participants who stutter read aloud under nonaltered auditory feedback (NAF) and four conditions of frequency-altered feedback ([FAF], plus/minus one-half and one-quarter octaves) at normal and fast speech rates. Stuttering frequency was significantly higher while reading aloud with NAF relative to the four conditions of FAF (p < 0.05). There were no differences among participants’ stuttering frequency between the four FAF conditions (p > 0.05). Reductions in stuttering frequency of approximately 50% to 60% were found with FAF relative to NAF. More disfluencies occurred with the fast versus the normal speech rate condition (p = .0007) irrespective of auditory feedback condition. These findings suggest that slight alterations in the frequency of auditory feedback of people who stutter are fluency-enhancing.

Acknowledgments
The first author is supported by the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Killam Trusts, Dalhousie University. This paper was presented in part at the 1995 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Orlando, Florida.
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