Creating Filters With Arbitrary Response Characteristics for Use in Hearing and Speech Research Digital filters with conventional lowpass, highpass, bandpass, and band reject frequency response curves are perfectly adequate for many research applications in speech and hearing. However, there are some specialized applications for which these conventional response characteristics are less than ideal. In this paper we describe a simple method for generating ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 1996
Creating Filters With Arbitrary Response Characteristics for Use in Hearing and Speech Research
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James Hillenbrand
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
  • Robert A. Houde
    RIT Research Corporation, Rochester, NY
  • Contact author: James Hillenbrand, PhD, Speech Pathology and Audiology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Ml 49008. E-mail: james.hillenbrand@wmich.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 1996
Creating Filters With Arbitrary Response Characteristics for Use in Hearing and Speech Research
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 390-395. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.390
History: Received July 5, 1995 , Accepted September 15, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 390-395. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.390
History: Received July 5, 1995; Accepted September 15, 1995

Digital filters with conventional lowpass, highpass, bandpass, and band reject frequency response curves are perfectly adequate for many research applications in speech and hearing. However, there are some specialized applications for which these conventional response characteristics are less than ideal. In this paper we describe a simple method for generating digital filters with virtually any amplitude and phase response. The process involves (a) calculating the impulse response of a finite impulse response filter from a text file that specifies the desired magnitude and phase response of the filter, and (b) convolving the impulse response with the input signal. Sample applications of this method are described.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a research grant from the National Institutes of Health (1-R01-DC01661). We are grateful to Bruce Smith, Tom Carrell, and two anonymous reviewers for helpful comments on a previous draft.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access