Glottal Airflow Characteristics of Women's Voice Production Along an Aging Continuum Anatomical and physiological changes of the speech production mechanism that occur with aging may result in phonatory distinctions between older and younger speakers. This investigation examined amplitude-based glottal airflow characteristics from sustained vowel production in healthy adult women. Sixty women participated in this study, 10 each in six age groups ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1996
Glottal Airflow Characteristics of Women's Voice Production Along an Aging Continuum
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine M. Sapienza
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Jeniffer Dutka
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Contact author: Christine M. Sapienza, Department of Communication Processes and Disorders, 455 Dauer Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. E-mail: sapienza@cpd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1996
Glottal Airflow Characteristics of Women's Voice Production Along an Aging Continuum
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 322-328. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.322
History: Received January 5, 1995 , Accepted October 23, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 322-328. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.322
History: Received January 5, 1995; Accepted October 23, 1995

Anatomical and physiological changes of the speech production mechanism that occur with aging may result in phonatory distinctions between older and younger speakers. This investigation examined amplitude-based glottal airflow characteristics from sustained vowel production in healthy adult women. Sixty women participated in this study, 10 each in six age groups of 20-, 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-, and 70-year-olds. Measures included peak, alternating, and minimum glottal airflow. Additionally, a ratio of minimum to peak glottal airflow was calculated. Results from an analysis of variance indicated no significant group mean difference for any of the dependent measures. A greater variability in peak glottal airflow for the 70-year-old age group as compared to the 20-year-old age group was found. None of the dependent variables were significantly related to age and therefore were not good predictors of age. The results imply that laryngeal senescence in healthy women may not be significant enough to affect the magnitude of phonatory function parameters. Either the assumed anatomical changes produce less significant phonatory change in the healthy individual or the healthy individual is more capable of using strategies to counteract degenerative laryngeal changes.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to extend their appreciation to all of the subjects who participated in this project. Appreciation is also extended to Megan Laux for her dedicated assistance. Sponsorship from CNPq-Brazil was provided to Jeniffer Dutka in support of her research training. Finally, the authors greatly appreciate the three reviewers’ comments regarding the content of this manuscript.
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