Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering: Establishing and Modifying Judgment Accuracy The purpose of this study was to determine whether accuracy training for interval judgments of stuttering might generalize to increased accuracy and/or interjudge agreement for intervals other than those used during training. Ten upper-division speech-language pathology students judged 5-s audiovisually recorded speech intervals as stuttered or nonstuttered in a series ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1996
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering: Establishing and Modifying Judgment Accuracy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Currently affiliated with The University of Georgia, Athens, GA
    Currently affiliated with The University of Georgia, Athens, GA×
  • Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, PhD, Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Georgia, 576 Aderhold Hall, Athens, GA 30602.
    Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, PhD, Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Georgia, 576 Aderhold Hall, Athens, GA 30602.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1996
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering: Establishing and Modifying Judgment Accuracy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 298-310. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.298
History: Received January 25, 1995 , Accepted August 21, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 298-310. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.298
History: Received January 25, 1995; Accepted August 21, 1995

The purpose of this study was to determine whether accuracy training for interval judgments of stuttering might generalize to increased accuracy and/or interjudge agreement for intervals other than those used during training. Ten upper-division speech-language pathology students judged 5-s audiovisually recorded speech intervals as stuttered or nonstuttered in a series of group and single-subject experiments. Judgment accuracy was determined with respect to judgments provided previously by 10 recognized authorities on stuttering and its treatment. Training occurred within single-subject experiments that used multiple baselines across speakers and repeated generalization probes to assess training effects. Results showed that judgment accuracy tended to increase after training for speakers used during the training process as well as for unfamiliar speakers. Results also replicated previous findings of slight increases in interjudge and intrajudge agreement after interval-judgment training. The implications of these results for developing a valid and reliable stuttering measurement system are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors express their appreciation to the students at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who served as judges for this study; to the students at the University of Minnesota who served as judges for the pilot work that led to this study; and, again, to our 10 authorities on stuttering research and treatment. As always, we are indebted to Richard Moglia and Peter Frank for expert technical and statistical assistance. This research was supported by National Institutes of Health research grant DC00060.
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