Spectral Distribution of Prosodic Information Prosodic speech cues for rhythm, stress, and intonation are related primarily to variations in intensity, duration, and fundamental frequency. Because these cues make use of temporal properties of the speech waveform they are likely to be represented broadly across the speech spectrum. In order to determine the relative importance of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1996
Spectral Distribution of Prosodic Information
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ken W. Grant
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Army Audiology and Speech Center, Washington, DC
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Army Audiology and Speech Center, Washington, DC
  • Contact author: Ken W. Grant, PhD, Army Audioiogy and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307.
    Contact author: Ken W. Grant, PhD, Army Audioiogy and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1996
Spectral Distribution of Prosodic Information
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 228-238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.228
History: Received March 14, 1995 , Accepted November 8, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1996, Vol. 39, 228-238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3902.228
History: Received March 14, 1995; Accepted November 8, 1995

Prosodic speech cues for rhythm, stress, and intonation are related primarily to variations in intensity, duration, and fundamental frequency. Because these cues make use of temporal properties of the speech waveform they are likely to be represented broadly across the speech spectrum. In order to determine the relative importance of different frequency regions for the recognition of Prosodic cues, identification of four Prosodic features, syllable number, syllabic stress, sentence intonation, and phrase boundary location, was evaluated under six filter conditions spanning the range from 200–6100 Hz. Each filter condition had equal articulation index (Al) weights, Al ½ 0.10; p(C)isolated words ≈ 0.40. Results obtained with normally hearing subjects showed that there was an interaction between filter condition and the identification of specific Prosodic features. For example, information from high-frequency regions of speech was particularly useful in the identification of syllable number and stress, whereas information from low-frequency regions was helpful in identifying intonation patterns. In spite of these spectral differences, overall listeners performed remarkably well in identifying Prosodic patterns, although individual differences were apparent. For some subjects, equivalent levels of performance across the six filter conditions were achieved. These results are discussed in relation to auditory and auditory-visual speech recognition.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grant number DC 00792 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and by the Clinical Investigation Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, under Work Unit #2511. The authors would like to thank Marjorie Leek, Van Summers, Lou Braida, Peter Blarney, and Dave Karpinski for their helpful suggestions and technical support. All subjects participating in this research provided written informed consent prior to beginning the study. The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.
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