Changes in Speech Production in a Child With a Cochlear Implant Acoustic and Kinematic Evidence Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2002
Changes in Speech Production in a Child With a Cochlear Implant
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa Goffman, PhD
    Audiology and Speech Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • David J. Ertmer
    Audiology and Speech Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Christa Erdle
    Audiology and Speech Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Lisa Goffman, PhD, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. E-mail: goffman@purdue.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 01, 2002
Changes in Speech Production in a Child With a Cochlear Implant
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2002, Vol. 45, 891-901. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/072)
History: Received June 4, 2001 , Accepted April 8, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2002, Vol. 45, 891-901. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/072)
History: Received June 4, 2001; Accepted April 8, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

A method is presented for examining change in motor patterns used to produce linguistic contrasts. In this case study, the method is applied to a child receiving new auditory input following cochlear implantation. This child experienced hearing loss at age 3 years and received a multichannel cochlear implant at age 7 years. Data collection points occurred both pre- and postimplant and included acoustic and kinematic analyses. Overall, this child's speech output was transcribed as accurate across the pre- and postimplant periods. Postimplant, with the onset of new auditory experience, acoustic durations showed a predictable maturational change, usually decreasing in duration. Conversely, the spatiotemporal stability of speech movements initially became more variable postimplantation. The auditory perturbations experienced by this child during development led to changes in the physiological underpinnings of speech production, even when speech output was perceived as accurate.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health (National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders) grant DC03025. We would like to thank the faculty and staff at the Indiana University Medical Center for providing audiometric and speech perception records and Julie Frushour Meek and Jennifer Huntman for their assistance with reliability. We are grateful to M and his family for their sustained and enthusiastic participation in this project.
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