Acoustic Variations in Reading Produced by Speakers With Spasmodic Dysphonia Pre-Botox Injection and Within Early Stages of Post-Botox Injection Acoustic analysis of a reading passage was used to identify the abnormal phonatory events associated with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) preand postinjection of Botulinum Toxin A (Botox). Thirty-one patients (age 22 to 74 years) diagnosed with ADSD were included for study. All patients were new recipients of Botox, and the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2002
Acoustic Variations in Reading Produced by Speakers With Spasmodic Dysphonia Pre-Botox Injection and Within Early Stages of Post-Botox Injection
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine M. Sapienza, PhD
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Florida Gainesville
  • Michael P. Cannito
    School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology The University of Memphis Memphis, TN
  • Thomas Murry
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Ryan Branski
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Florida Gainesville
  • Gayle Woodson
    Department of Otolaryngology University of Florida Gainesville
  • Contact author: Christine M. Sapienza, PhD, University of Florida, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 63 Dauer Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611. E-mail: Sapienza@csd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2002
Acoustic Variations in Reading Produced by Speakers With Spasmodic Dysphonia Pre-Botox Injection and Within Early Stages of Post-Botox Injection
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2002, Vol. 45, 830-843. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/067)
History: Received September 21, 2001 , Accepted April 26, 2002
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2002, Vol. 45, 830-843. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/067)
History: Received September 21, 2001; Accepted April 26, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 23

Acoustic analysis of a reading passage was used to identify the abnormal phonatory events associated with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) preand postinjection of Botulinum Toxin A (Botox). Thirty-one patients (age 22 to 74 years) diagnosed with ADSD were included for study. All patients were new recipients of Botox, and the examination of their voice occurred before and after their initial injection of Botox. Acoustic events were identified from reading samples of the Rainbow Passage produced by each of the patients. These events were examined from sentences containing primarily voiced sound segments. Dependent variables included the number of phonatory breaks, frequency shifts, and aperiodic segments—all variables previously defined by the investigators. Additionally, calculated variables were made of the percentage of time these events occurred relative to the duration of the cumulative voiced segments. A sexand age-matched control group (±2 years) was included for statistical comparison. Results indicated that those with ADSD produced more aberrant acoustic events than the controls. Aperiodicity was the predominant acoustic event produced during the reading, followed by frequency shifts and phonatory breaks. Within the ADSD group, the number of atypical acoustic events decreased following Botox injection. It is important that the occurrence of specific abnormal acoustic events was sufficient to differentiate the disordered speakers from the controls following as well as preceding initial Botox injection, as indicated by discriminant function analysis. This paper complements our previous work using this acoustic analysis method for defining the abnormal events present in the voice of those with ADSD and further suggests that these measures can be used in conjunction with perceptual impressions to differentiate speakers on the basis of initial severity.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by Grant 1-R15-DC/OD02299-01A1 from the National Institutes of Health (NIDCD; M. P. Cannito, Principal Investigator). The authors also express their appreciation to Brenda Bender, PhD, for assistance with data management and statistical analyses.
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